COVID-19 Updates

To keep the public informed, the Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders are providing regular updates in government services and pertinent links regarding COVID-19. Coronavirus is a serious illness that spreads from person to person. Cape May County officials are working closely with the State and Federal Government to provide the latest information to help mitigate the spread of this virus.

Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton and Freeholder Jeffrey L. Pierson, who oversees the Cape May County Department of Health want to assure everyone that the County is closely monitoring the spread of COVID-19 in Cape May County and throughout the region. Their foremost goal is to protect the well-being of our employees and families as well as our residents and visitors and continue to provide essential services to our County.

County government will continue to operate, and all government functions will be offered with some adjustments including limited hours of operation and reduced services. Communications remain open and the public is encouraged to call or email for needed services or information.

We are all working together to keep you informed and safe.

Gerald M. Thornton, Freeholder Director
Jeffrey L. Pierson, Freeholder, liaison, Health and Human Services.


Governor Philip D. Murphy 

Executive Orders Regarding COVID-19

Administrative Orders Regarding COVID-19


The Board of Chosen Freeholders have passed resolutions regarding COVID-19, click here to view the resolutions.

Six Feet Saves Successfully Launched in Cape May County

“As Memorial Weekend is underway Cape May County Department of Health wants to stress, we are not out of the woodwork yet. We urge our residents and visitors to continue to take precaution against COVID-19 to protect themselves and others. When outside a mask is not mandatory, but is recommended, if you are unable to keep at least six feet from others,” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer.

Cape May County Department of Health is proud to announce their social distance campaign, Six Feet Saves has successfully launched on May 15, 2020 in Cape May. Since the launch, Cape May County’s Social Distance Ambassadors have been to Wildwood’s Boardwalk and Ocean City’s Boardwalk. Six Feet Saves is an education campaign that will be implemented to remind individuals to keep their distance to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Social Distance Ambassadors will be out in the community thanking individuals who continue taking preventive action against COVID-19, such as social distancing, wearing a cloth mask over their nose, and mouth if they cannot social distance, and washing their hands frequently. They will also be giving out education materials to individuals that are interested. 

Social Distancing Ambassadors will be wearing vests with the county seal on them, so they can be easily identified. The Six Feet Saves Social Distance Ambassador team will be made up of Medical Reserve Corp. members and Cape May County Department of Health staff. Medical Reserve Corp. is a volunteer program comprised of medical and non-medical individuals. To learn more about Medical Reserve Corp. and how you can volunteer you can visit cmchealth.net or call (609) 465-1187. 

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.


Social Distancing Ambassador Program Future Dates 

The Social Distancing Ambassador program by the Cape May County Health Department has announced more dates after its initial positive test run. The program will continue in Stone Harbor on Friday and run until June 13th, with the possibility of more dates being added down the line. The Social Distancing Ambassadors includes two representatives from the Cape May County Health Department and volunteers from the Reserve Medical Corp of Cape May County who visit the different shore towns.

The program has been designed to provide positive reinforcement for people that are properly socially distancing or wearing masks. There is no enforcement element involved with this initiative. Information is also available for people wanting the latest COVID-19 safety information. Proper sanitation and hand hygiene are followed throughout the two hours while providing information to the public.

“This program has gotten a great reception and has gotten Cape May County a lot of positive attention,” said Freeholder Jeff Pierson, liaison to the Health Department. “Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton had a great idea that we were able to implement with Health Officer Kevin Thomas. The entire Health Department has been phenomenal through this entire pandemic.”

Below is the schedule of the dates, municipalities, and times the Social Distancing Ambassadors will be out throughout Cape May County:

May 22 – Stone Harbor – 10 A.M. until Noon

May 28 – Sea Isle City – 10 A.M. until Noon

May 29 – Avalon – 10 A.M. until Noon

May 29 – Cape May – 1 P.M. until 3 P.M.

May 30 – Stone Harbor – 10 A.M. until Noon

June 5 – Wildwood – 10 A.M. until Noon

June 5 – Avalon – 1 P.M. until 3 P.M.

June 6 – Ocean City – 10 A.M. until Noon

June 12 – Cape May – 10 A.M. until Noon

June 12 – Sea Isle City – 1 P.M. until 3 P.M.

June 13 – Wildwood – 10 A.M. until Noon

“I want to thank our staff with the Cape May County Health Department,” said Thornton. “We are blessed to have a tremendous staff working for the County during this very difficult time. Encouraging people to take proper safety precautions is one of the ways we will safely get our County reopen as we continue to work with the Governor’s office.”


Contact Tracing Information and Job Portal

Contact tracing, a core disease control measure employed by local and state health department personnel for decades, is a key strategy for preventing further spread of COVID-19. Contact tracing is part of the process of supporting patients with suspected or confirmed infection.

In contact tracing, public health staff work with a patient to help them recall everyone with whom they have had close contact during the timeframe while they may have been infectious. Public health staff then warn these exposed individuals (contacts) of their potential exposure as rapidly and sensitively as possible.

Contacts are provided with education, information, and support to understand their risk, what they should do to separate themselves from others who are not exposed, monitor themselves for illness, and the possibility that they could spread the infection to others even if they themselves do not feel ill.

Contacts are encouraged to stay home and maintain social distance from others (at least 6 feet) until 14 days after their last exposure, in case they also become ill. They should monitor themselves by checking their temperature twice daily and watching for cough or shortness of breath. To the extent possible, public health staff should check in with contacts to make sure they are self-monitoring and have not developed symptoms. Contacts who develop symptoms should promptly isolate themselves and notify public health staff. They should be promptly evaluated for infection and for the need for medical care.

Recently, Governor Murphy highlighted the state’s effort to build a contact-tracing corps that will supplement the roughly 800 staff and volunteers now doing this work on a local and county level. The governor said the state would tap public health students at Rutgers University and other colleges for assistance, plus contract with a staffing company to hire additional tracers. 

Murphy said contact tracers will be paid $25 an hour, and will either be employed by the state, Rutgers or the contractor, officials said. (Interested individuals can also sign up online.)

https://covid19.nj.gov/forms/tracer

The state will foot the bill for a new technology platform to provide training and data-collection functions for all contact tracers, regardless of where they are deployed, officials said. Their findings will be compiled in a central state database, although the privacy of those who test positive will be protected, according to DOH.

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit https://capemaycountynj.gov/ or Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.


Social Distance Ambassadors are Coming to your Community 

5/12/20- Cape May County Department of Health is proud to announce their social distance campaign, Six Feet Saves. Six Feet Saves is an educational campaign that will be implemented to remind individuals to keep their distance to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Social Distance Ambassadors will be monitoring high volume areas, such as boardwalks, to remind individuals to keep their six feet, and to give educational materials on how to prevent being exposed.

“As public places begin to reopen it is important to continue to take proper precautions, such as wearing a mask, washing hands frequently, and social distancing. Cape May County Department of Health wants to remind residents and visitors to continue taking action to slow the spread of COVID-19. By protecting yourself and others you can help save lives,” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer.

Cape May County Department of Health’s education campaign Six Feet Saves, will launch on May 15, 2020 in Cape May. The campaign will be comprised of Social Distance Ambassadors who will remind individuals to keep their six feet and give out educational materials on how to prevent being exposed to COVID-19. Social Distancing Ambassadors will be wearing vests with the county seal on them so they can be easily identified.

Six Feet Saves Lives Social Distance Ambassador team will be made up of Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) members and Cape May County Department of Health staff. MRC is a volunteer program made up of medical and non-medical individuals. To learn more about MRC and how you can volunteer visit cmchealth.net or call (609) 463-6692. Visit the following link to volunteer to be for the Social Distance Ambassador.

For additional information on what Cape May County is doing to slow the spread of COVID-19 visit www.cmchealth.net. You can also like Cape May County Department of Health on Facebook or call (609) 463-1187.


As Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases Continue to Increase Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommends Wearing a Cloth Face Covering in Public Settings

4/18/20- “The number one prevention method against COVID-19 remains social distancing. Individuals should only leave their homes for essential travel. When essential travel is necessary to a public place that social distancing is difficult the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, recommends the use of a cloth face covering to slow the spread of COVID-19.” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer. 

CDC is recommending the use of cloth face masks to help individuals who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. The cloth mask should be used in public settings where social distancing can be difficult, for example grocery stores and pharmacies. Cloth face coverings can be made from common household items at low cost. The cloth face covering that are being recommended by the CDC are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators, these supplies should be reserved for healthcare works and other medical first responders. 

Cloth Face Coverings Should: 

  • Fit snugly but comfortably against the side of the face.
  • Be secured with ties or ear loops.
  • Include multiple layers of fabric.
  • Allow for breathing without restriction.
  • Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance. Cloth face coverings should be routinely washed depending on the frequency of use. The face covering can be simple washed in the washing machine. When removing the cloth face covering it is important not to touch one’s eyes, nose, and mouth until they have washed their hands. 

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.